WILDER SHORES OF LOVE

Garth Clark

Garth Clark

(Source: abridurif, via iseo58)

Madame Yevonde’s Goddesses, 1935

Madame Yevonde’s Goddesses, 1935

(Source: weheartit.com, via pseuglam)

QUR’ANIC PRAYER BOARD, POSSIBLY HAUSSA OR NUPE, NIGERIA 21 1/2 in by 12 3/4 in (54.6, 32.4 cm)

QUR’ANIC PRAYER BOARD, POSSIBLY HAUSSA OR NUPE, NIGERIA 21 1/2 in by 12 3/4 in (54.6, 32.4 cm)

(Source: virtual-artifacts, via pseuglam)

Cultura Totonaque, Veracruz Mexico (300-1100)

Cultura Totonaque, Veracruz Mexico (300-1100)

(Source: the-seraphic-book-of-eloy)

A late and unorganised thought. I do not feel a lot of connection with my body. I decorate it like a bedroom: a reflection, but nothing more. I move a lot. It’s not important. A mind with a body, never the other way around.

Having a body is an annoyance. I take pills to be coherent, to be without pain. I am at the mercy of medicine’s side effects. I cannot get things done. I am tired, distracted. I am sick partly out of character, but also chemistry. This furthers the distance, I think.

I dressed initially for protection and then to achieve a goal. I like to be a certain way, to align myself a particular way. The flesh, however, does not interest me. I cannot accurately express this. I tell my doctor, and I wildly wave my hands, ‘I just don’t care.’

After things really fell apart, after I was really hollowed out, when there was really nothing left on the inside, pretty was what I needed. I had a pretty job, a pretty wardrobe, pretty hair, pretty face. People said the word back to me.

I am so nauseated at the thought of initial attraction belonging to my body. I am so confused, always, so distraught at being a building at not its occupants. Pretty did not work. Pretty felt more like the constant threat of bodily harm. Having men approach me, speak to me, shout at me, touch me in public, this was all a strange assault. I don’t even know what to do with this. I do not relate to this. 

I keep things uglier now. More dishevelled. Ugly is safe. And no more or less true than pretty. Never more, never less. 

The work of the eyes is done. Go now and do the heart-work on the images imprisoned within you. Rainer Maria Rilke

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via pseuglam)

Francisco Alcaraz’s Saint Teresa of Avila

Francisco Alcaraz’s Saint Teresa of Avila

(Source: getawaymavens.com, via theraccolta)

Vincent van Gogh, Landscape with House and Ploughman, 1889

Vincent van Gogh, Landscape with House and Ploughman, 1889

(Source: urgetocreate, via alien--witch)

Window of the bou inania medersa , Féz

Window of the bou inania medersa , Féz

(Source: scentdelanature, via iseo58)


Detail from a court ensemble, made in Italy in 1857 (source). Other views of this dress: 1, 2, 3, 4.

Detail from a court ensemble, made in Italy in 1857 (source). Other views of this dress: 1, 2, 3, 4.

(via pseuglam)

I can feel it in my bones

Omo Masalai, Papua New Guinea

photos: Eric Lafforgue, Timothy Allen

(Source: shovelmercenary, via godisaflower)

Chamba Diviners bag, Nigeria

Chamba Diviners bag, Nigeria

(Source: artafrica)

With the exception of a few random places like Shankar’s International Dolls Museum, Vishala Environmental Centre for Heritage and Arts’ Utensils Museum and Sudha Cars Museum, the blog hasn’t spent much time in India. Well, let me change that with this next post. Second only to the Taj Mahal in India’s tourism department, the Rock Garden of Chandigarh is probably one of the best known examples of outsider art. Beginning in 1957, government official Nek Chand began collecting materials from demolition sites in his spare time. He then made art out of the scrap and other waste materials, using bottles, glass, bangles, tiles, ceramic pots, and sinks. But he had to work in secret because he was using a location near Sukhna Lake in a deeply-wooded gorge, which had been designated as a land conservancy. By the time the authorities found out in 1975 Chand’s garden had grown into a 12-acre complex (today it is over 40 acres) of man-made interlinked waterfalls and courtyards filled with hundreds of concrete sculptures. You’d think a one-of-a-kind sanctuary would have faced the bulldozers. But despite protests and calls for Chand to be punished, the rock garden was turned into a public space and the artist continued his work. In 1990, a road for the exclusive use of VIPs was to be built right through the middle of the garden and trees were cleared for its construction. There was a lengthy court battle, eventually resulting in victory. But when Chand left the country in 1996 the government withdrew its funding and the park was vandalised. That incident, and the governmental scandal that resulted from it, birthed the Nek Chand Foundation, a non-profit organization that ensures his work will remain preserved, protected and open to the public for many years to come.

(Image Source 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

(via requiescence)

Africa | Traditional hats worn by Zulu women, in South Africa

Africa | Traditional hats worn by Zulu women, in South Africa

(Source: virtual-artifacts, via artafrica)

Kaishi Hen, an 18th century Japanese anatomical atlas

(Source: paintdeath, via godisaflower)